Casting vs Flipping | Catch More Fish on a Texas Rig

Casting vs Flipping | Catch More Fish on a Texas Rig


 When throwing a Texas rig, there are two main techniques anglers use: flipping and casting. Casting is the most common and easiest technique, allowing anglers to cast further and reach some difficult spots. Flipping, or pitching, allows anglers to have a more finesse approach and increased accuracy on shorter casts. Watch this video more a more in-depth look on casting and flipping/pitching, and how using both techniques can increase the amount of fish you land.

Do you like FREE stuff? Sign up to our VIP mailing list to get unpublished offers like FREE BAIT FRIDAY texted to your phone every week. Seriously! It's FREE TO JOIN, and we send you a code good for a different FREE BAIT every FRIDAY!

Video transcript:

Alex Rudd:
What's up, guys? Welcome back to the Monster Bass Channel. For you guys that don't know me, my name is Alex Rudd, and I own and operate the Alex Rudd Fishing YouTube channel. But today I'm here with you guys on the Monster Bass YouTube channel, and we're going to be discussing the difference between casting a Texas rig and pitching and/or flipping a Texas rig. And why do we do two different things with a Texas rig?

Alex Rudd:
And so to break it down pretty simply, it's two almost different techniques to fishing the Texas rig and how we like to fish the Texas rig, and there's really an application for both of them. And so that's what we're going to be breaking down today. I'm going to be breaking down situations where you would probably want to cast a Texas rig versus situations where you'll want to either pitch or flip the Texas rig.

Alex Rudd:
I think in front of us, you guys can see there's a rock. There's a few lay downs and stuff like that. And so a lot of the fish we've been catching today are on the ends of lay downs. And so in that scenario, I don't really want to get up on those fish. There's certain scenarios where fish are either going to be pressured or they're going to be skittish or they're just living in a little bit deeper water that you can't be right up on top of them to actually pitch to them, and that's where you're actually going to want to cast your Texas rig.

Alex Rudd:
You also want to be casting your Texas rig when you're wanting to cover a lot more water with your bait. And so you can cover a lot of water pitching a Texas rig, but you're target-oriented. You're target fishing. You're flipping certain things. You're moving up a bank really fast. But then there's other times you just want to drag that Texas rig around, and so that's where you're going to actually want to cast it.

Alex Rudd:
Right now, obviously you guys can tell it's really cold outside, and so dragging this Texas rig around and being really slow and covering as much water from that two-foot mark out to the six-foot mark where we're sitting is going to be what you want to do to try to get bites. Whereas when it starts to get a little bit warmer and those fish start to move up shallow, that's where you're actually going to want to start pitching that bait and just being very target-oriented at what you're throwing at.

Alex Rudd:
A great example of something to cast that you guys can see this tree laying down in the water here. It's laying down out in the water. The end of it's probably out there somewhere. So in this scenario, I'm going to back off this thing. Obviously, if I try to pitch it, I'm going to have way too dramatic of a cast to get that bait there. So what I want to do here is I just want to cast that Texas rig up to the base of that tree, so that I can then drag it out to the end of that tree and fish that whole entire tree with this Texas rig, which looks like a little crawdad crawling around on that tree, and keep that bait in the strike zone longer and hopefully trick a bass into eating this thing.

Alex Rudd:
So when you're thinking about it, when you're thinking, do I cast it, do I pitch it, what scenario and what situation do I find myself in, fish to your ability, I think would be the best thing that I can say there. If you feel more comfortable casting, then cast your Texas rig. If you feel more comfortable pitching, go pitch your Texas rig, but get out there and practice. I think that's the biggest thing that we need to remember.

Alex Rudd:
And even me, as a guy who's been fishing for as long as I can remember and has thousands of hours on the water, I still go out and practice things. I still put the buckets out in the yard and make a game out of it and see who can flip the most into the coffee can. And whoever flips gets the most points. But all it's doing is it's helping me to practice those skills that I know I need. It's the fundamentals of bass fishing. And I think when you practice those fundamentals, you get better and better at those, and that is what gets you to the next step of being able to climb the ladder as an angler.

Older Post Newer Post


Leave a comment


0 comments

MONSTERBASS December Unboxing

December Unboxing | MONSTERBASS

Posted by 🔥 MONSTERBASS 🔥

7:46

Watch more videos