Fall Swimbait Tips for MONSTERBASS (Best Ways To Rig)

Want to catch MONSTERBASS in the fall? Checkout these high producing tips from Jeremy with @Fishing the LoneStar The swimbait or paddletail plastic is a classic when it comes to fall bass fishing. Here are some of the best ways to rig a plastic swimbait.

Click here to check out Jeremy's channel.

Click here to subscribe to our channel for Pro tips and Bait breakdowns on a monthly basis.

Join today and save $10 off your first box. 
Use code SAVE10 at checkout.  JOIN NOW

 #MONSTERBASS #swimbaitfishing #swimjigfishing #fallbassfishing #bassfishingtips #fishingthelonestar

 Video Transcript:

Jeremy:
That's a good one here. That is why I love throwing a swimbait.

Jeremy:
What's up ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls. Welcome back to the MONSTERBASS channel. My name is Jeremy, with Fishing the LoneStar. I'm actually located in Dallas, Texas, and would love it if you hopped over to my channel, it'll be linked below. Follow me for content there on YouTube. Once a week, I try to get out and fish. Give you some fun updates about what's happening in the South region. How bass are eating, how they're feeding, how they're patterning, what's working, et cetera. And also on Instagram, where I post daily content about what I'm doing to catch fish in the South region.

Jeremy:
But enough about me, let's get into today's topic and this video on swimbaits. And I'll tell you, this month's MONSTERBASS Box was loaded with great baits for the fall. I'm telling you, this was a phenomenal box this month. So if you're not currently subscribed to The Better Box, the MONSTERBASS Regional Pro Box, then go get subscribed. There'll be a link below. Go sign up today. Get subscribed, because this box is awesome. And I'll tell you, you're not going to want to miss out on the months that are coming in The Better Box. Check out MONSTERBASS.

Jeremy:
In this month's box, one of the baits that I absolutely love throwing is a paddle tail swimbait. This particular one was by Big Bite Baits, and is the Finesse Swimmer, a 4.4 inch paddle tail swimbait. The reason why paddle tail swimbaits are my favorite bait to throw is because there are so many different ways you can rig them. There's so many different applications you can use for a paddle tail swimbait. And let's face it, what bass eat the most are bait fish. So why not throw something that looks like a bait fish?

Jeremy:
In this video, we're going to break down this particular bait, how you use it, how you rig it, where you should throw it, the equipment you should use, and how to retrieve it, all to help you catch some bigger fish and some better bass. So let's dive in.

Jeremy:
All right, first, let's talk about rigging techniques, and there's tons of different ways to rig a paddle tail swimbait. You can throw it on the back of a buzzbait, on a spinnerbait, multiple different things, ways to rig, on a chatterbait, et cetera. Those are all very viable options. I'm just going to talk about the three ways though, that I rig the most. And the first one is going to be in a swim jig, or on the back of a swim jig.

Jeremy:
And this particular color that came in this month's MONSTERBASS Box, for this Big Bite Baits Finesse Swimmer, is the Tennessee shad. That's what I got, at least. You probably got something different or a different color. I know some regions got a bluegill color. That's also phenomenal. So what you'll see here, is it's tied onto or placed on the back of a swim jig.

Jeremy:
A swim jig, for me though, helps sometimes draw bigger bites. You'll see that the profile is just wider. It's bigger. It's thicker than just a paddle tail swimbait by itself. That bigger profile sometimes will draw you bigger bites. And what I love about a swim jig, is it's still weedless, with a weed guard that's on the top. But very easily though, you have an exposed hook when you push that weed guard down. So hook-up ratio is still really good on a swim jig.

Jeremy:
Now, the next way I like to rig them is on an underspin. So you'll see here, this is an underspin. And also, this is a weedless underspin, but what came in this month's MONSTERBASS Box is the Hybrid Airdrop underspin by Zero Gravity. So a great lure presentation, nearly half an ounce, but definitely has some size to it. It's a little bit bigger in terms of just the head. But what I really like about this one is it has eyes on it.

Jeremy:
Now, I don't know if that makes a ton of difference in terms of fish and attracting fish, but I've always done really well with an underspin that has a jig head with eyes on it. I would absolutely pair those two together. This little willow blade will flicker, just like bait fish flickers. So you've got a bigger target and a flickering, smaller target with a willow blade underspin. That's really going to help draw bites and attract fish as they're chasing shad and other small bait fish and schools. This is a really good option.

Jeremy:
And then last, if you're not going to go with a swim jig or a underspin, I like just your traditional weedless belly-weighted hook. This is a screw lock, in a quarter ounce weight. And you'll see right now, the hook tip is a little exposed. But also, you can expose that, put the hook right into the plastic, and you have a weedless profile there, as well. All three of these options are weedless, just because the last time I was out, I needed to be weedless. But again, you can throw them on an exposed jig head hook, as well. But between a normal weedless swimbait jig, an underspin and a swim jig, those are my three favorite ways to rig a paddle tail swimbait.

Jeremy:
Now, let's talk about where you're casting it and where you're retrieving, and targeting an underspin. Now, right now, this time of year, bass are chasing bait fish up shallow, for the most part. So they're crashing on banks and pushing bait fish up against the bank. They're chasing bait fish into the back of creeks and creek channels and cove pockets. So I would target any type of lay down grass structure, cover, or just bank lines in general, if you're bank fishing.

Jeremy:
And I would go parallel to the bank, and bring your retrieve back down. That's going to be the best place to target fish right now, with an underspin. But naturally, anywhere there's grass or cover, timber, et cetera, throw a swim bait there and throw it in one of the weedless options. You're going to have a lot of success doing that.

Jeremy:
The way I would retrieve them and what I would use as well, in terms of gear, first of all, the gear ratio, this is a 7.5 reel by Lew's. It's a custom black. I would go 7.5 or faster. You're throwing a moving bait. You want to keep it moving. And when a fish hits it, you want to be able to catch up and pick up site, pretty quickly. So gear ratio, I would say 7.5 or faster.

Jeremy:
The rod, the line, et cetera, you'll notice all of these hooks are pretty heavy gauge. So I would recommend using heavy line. Now, in the South, where I'm at, I use 17 to 20 pound fluorocarbon on pretty much all of my moving baits, with the exception of crank baits. That's just what I do. I want to be able to hook into a big fish and land that big fish. So I have 20 pound fluorocarbon tied on here, on a 7.5 reel, and on a heavy rod. This is the TFO 7'3'' Heavy Rod, but it's got a good, nice, soft, sensitive tip that keeps fish pinned when I hook up. So a medium heavy or a heavy rod should do the trick for you with this application.

Jeremy:
Now, the retrieval. Pretty straightforward, guys. A swim jig is going to be a little bit different, but for the other two, both an underspin or a belly-weighted EWG swimbait hook, you're literally just going to cast. When the bait hits the water, I would count 1,001, 1,002, 1,003. Basically, a foot... I'm sorry, a second per foot that you want the bait to drop. So if you want to fish it somewhat right underneath the water column, then maybe do 1,001 and begin your steady retrieve. If you know you're fishing in five to six foot of water, you want to get down deeper, let that bait sink, count to five or six. Let it get down there and then start your retrieve.

Jeremy:
But ultimately, basically, you want to point the rod right at your lure, and just have a steady retrieve. Somewhere along this speed. And then once you feel a bite, you're going to feel that thump-thump, quick couple of ticks of your line, and a hard hook set. I mean, you want to really lay into these fish because again, you're throwing heavy gauge hooks on some of these lures, with heavy line and a heavy rod. You want to be able to set that hook really well in a fish's mouth. So heavy hook set, but a pretty steady retrieve, guys. You're just going to cast, point your rod, and a steady retrieve, and just be ready at any point in time to then set the hook. But that's at least what I do.

Jeremy:
The Big Bite Baits Finesse Swimmer at 4.4 size, and especially in this color, Tennessee shad, my goodness, that is such a good looking profile. If you're throwing it on a swimbait hook, it will roll a little bit from side to side. If you're throwing it on a underspin or a swim jig, it will stay really straight. But that tail, the way this plastic is designed, that tail gives a lot of kick and a lot of action. So you're going to get a lot of movement out of this particular paddle tail swimbait, and a lot of action and draw a lot of bites.

Jeremy:
All right, guys. That is it for this month's MONSTERBASS Box, and highlighting the Big Bite Baits Finesse Swimmer, that 4.4 inch paddle tail swimbait. It is my favorite bait, because it catches fish so dang well. Get a paddle tail swimbait. Grab you some of these accessories, a swim jig, the underspin, or just a belly-weighted EWG hook, and this particular bait by Big Bite Baits, and get out and catch some monster bass.

Jeremy:
My name is Jeremy, with Fishing the LoneStar. Make sure you subscribe below to the MONSTERBASS channel. Get out there, go catch some big fish.

Jeremy:
It's a good three and a half, four pound, right there. It's an awesome fish.


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Fall Swimbait Tips for MONSTERBASS (Best Ways To Rig)

Dec 16, 2020 Fishing Tips

Want to catch MONSTERBASS in the fall? Checkout these high producing tips from Jeremy with @Fishing the LoneStar The swimbait or paddletail plastic is a classic when it comes to fall bass fishing. Here are some of the best ways to rig a plastic swimbait.

Click here to check out Jeremy's channel.

Click here to subscribe to our channel for Pro tips and Bait breakdowns on a monthly basis.

Join today and save $10 off your first box. 
Use code SAVE10 at checkout.  JOIN NOW

 #MONSTERBASS #swimbaitfishing #swimjigfishing #fallbassfishing #bassfishingtips #fishingthelonestar

 Video Transcript:

Jeremy:
That's a good one here. That is why I love throwing a swimbait.

Jeremy:
What's up ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls. Welcome back to the MONSTERBASS channel. My name is Jeremy, with Fishing the LoneStar. I'm actually located in Dallas, Texas, and would love it if you hopped over to my channel, it'll be linked below. Follow me for content there on YouTube. Once a week, I try to get out and fish. Give you some fun updates about what's happening in the South region. How bass are eating, how they're feeding, how they're patterning, what's working, et cetera. And also on Instagram, where I post daily content about what I'm doing to catch fish in the South region.

Jeremy:
But enough about me, let's get into today's topic and this video on swimbaits. And I'll tell you, this month's MONSTERBASS Box was loaded with great baits for the fall. I'm telling you, this was a phenomenal box this month. So if you're not currently subscribed to The Better Box, the MONSTERBASS Regional Pro Box, then go get subscribed. There'll be a link below. Go sign up today. Get subscribed, because this box is awesome. And I'll tell you, you're not going to want to miss out on the months that are coming in The Better Box. Check out MONSTERBASS.

Jeremy:
In this month's box, one of the baits that I absolutely love throwing is a paddle tail swimbait. This particular one was by Big Bite Baits, and is the Finesse Swimmer, a 4.4 inch paddle tail swimbait. The reason why paddle tail swimbaits are my favorite bait to throw is because there are so many different ways you can rig them. There's so many different applications you can use for a paddle tail swimbait. And let's face it, what bass eat the most are bait fish. So why not throw something that looks like a bait fish?

Jeremy:
In this video, we're going to break down this particular bait, how you use it, how you rig it, where you should throw it, the equipment you should use, and how to retrieve it, all to help you catch some bigger fish and some better bass. So let's dive in.

Jeremy:
All right, first, let's talk about rigging techniques, and there's tons of different ways to rig a paddle tail swimbait. You can throw it on the back of a buzzbait, on a spinnerbait, multiple different things, ways to rig, on a chatterbait, et cetera. Those are all very viable options. I'm just going to talk about the three ways though, that I rig the most. And the first one is going to be in a swim jig, or on the back of a swim jig.

Jeremy:
And this particular color that came in this month's MONSTERBASS Box, for this Big Bite Baits Finesse Swimmer, is the Tennessee shad. That's what I got, at least. You probably got something different or a different color. I know some regions got a bluegill color. That's also phenomenal. So what you'll see here, is it's tied onto or placed on the back of a swim jig.

Jeremy:
A swim jig, for me though, helps sometimes draw bigger bites. You'll see that the profile is just wider. It's bigger. It's thicker than just a paddle tail swimbait by itself. That bigger profile sometimes will draw you bigger bites. And what I love about a swim jig, is it's still weedless, with a weed guard that's on the top. But very easily though, you have an exposed hook when you push that weed guard down. So hook-up ratio is still really good on a swim jig.

Jeremy:
Now, the next way I like to rig them is on an underspin. So you'll see here, this is an underspin. And also, this is a weedless underspin, but what came in this month's MONSTERBASS Box is the Hybrid Airdrop underspin by Zero Gravity. So a great lure presentation, nearly half an ounce, but definitely has some size to it. It's a little bit bigger in terms of just the head. But what I really like about this one is it has eyes on it.

Jeremy:
Now, I don't know if that makes a ton of difference in terms of fish and attracting fish, but I've always done really well with an underspin that has a jig head with eyes on it. I would absolutely pair those two together. This little willow blade will flicker, just like bait fish flickers. So you've got a bigger target and a flickering, smaller target with a willow blade underspin. That's really going to help draw bites and attract fish as they're chasing shad and other small bait fish and schools. This is a really good option.

Jeremy:
And then last, if you're not going to go with a swim jig or a underspin, I like just your traditional weedless belly-weighted hook. This is a screw lock, in a quarter ounce weight. And you'll see right now, the hook tip is a little exposed. But also, you can expose that, put the hook right into the plastic, and you have a weedless profile there, as well. All three of these options are weedless, just because the last time I was out, I needed to be weedless. But again, you can throw them on an exposed jig head hook, as well. But between a normal weedless swimbait jig, an underspin and a swim jig, those are my three favorite ways to rig a paddle tail swimbait.

Jeremy:
Now, let's talk about where you're casting it and where you're retrieving, and targeting an underspin. Now, right now, this time of year, bass are chasing bait fish up shallow, for the most part. So they're crashing on banks and pushing bait fish up against the bank. They're chasing bait fish into the back of creeks and creek channels and cove pockets. So I would target any type of lay down grass structure, cover, or just bank lines in general, if you're bank fishing.

Jeremy:
And I would go parallel to the bank, and bring your retrieve back down. That's going to be the best place to target fish right now, with an underspin. But naturally, anywhere there's grass or cover, timber, et cetera, throw a swim bait there and throw it in one of the weedless options. You're going to have a lot of success doing that.

Jeremy:
The way I would retrieve them and what I would use as well, in terms of gear, first of all, the gear ratio, this is a 7.5 reel by Lew's. It's a custom black. I would go 7.5 or faster. You're throwing a moving bait. You want to keep it moving. And when a fish hits it, you want to be able to catch up and pick up site, pretty quickly. So gear ratio, I would say 7.5 or faster.

Jeremy:
The rod, the line, et cetera, you'll notice all of these hooks are pretty heavy gauge. So I would recommend using heavy line. Now, in the South, where I'm at, I use 17 to 20 pound fluorocarbon on pretty much all of my moving baits, with the exception of crank baits. That's just what I do. I want to be able to hook into a big fish and land that big fish. So I have 20 pound fluorocarbon tied on here, on a 7.5 reel, and on a heavy rod. This is the TFO 7'3'' Heavy Rod, but it's got a good, nice, soft, sensitive tip that keeps fish pinned when I hook up. So a medium heavy or a heavy rod should do the trick for you with this application.

Jeremy:
Now, the retrieval. Pretty straightforward, guys. A swim jig is going to be a little bit different, but for the other two, both an underspin or a belly-weighted EWG swimbait hook, you're literally just going to cast. When the bait hits the water, I would count 1,001, 1,002, 1,003. Basically, a foot... I'm sorry, a second per foot that you want the bait to drop. So if you want to fish it somewhat right underneath the water column, then maybe do 1,001 and begin your steady retrieve. If you know you're fishing in five to six foot of water, you want to get down deeper, let that bait sink, count to five or six. Let it get down there and then start your retrieve.

Jeremy:
But ultimately, basically, you want to point the rod right at your lure, and just have a steady retrieve. Somewhere along this speed. And then once you feel a bite, you're going to feel that thump-thump, quick couple of ticks of your line, and a hard hook set. I mean, you want to really lay into these fish because again, you're throwing heavy gauge hooks on some of these lures, with heavy line and a heavy rod. You want to be able to set that hook really well in a fish's mouth. So heavy hook set, but a pretty steady retrieve, guys. You're just going to cast, point your rod, and a steady retrieve, and just be ready at any point in time to then set the hook. But that's at least what I do.

Jeremy:
The Big Bite Baits Finesse Swimmer at 4.4 size, and especially in this color, Tennessee shad, my goodness, that is such a good looking profile. If you're throwing it on a swimbait hook, it will roll a little bit from side to side. If you're throwing it on a underspin or a swim jig, it will stay really straight. But that tail, the way this plastic is designed, that tail gives a lot of kick and a lot of action. So you're going to get a lot of movement out of this particular paddle tail swimbait, and a lot of action and draw a lot of bites.

Jeremy:
All right, guys. That is it for this month's MONSTERBASS Box, and highlighting the Big Bite Baits Finesse Swimmer, that 4.4 inch paddle tail swimbait. It is my favorite bait, because it catches fish so dang well. Get a paddle tail swimbait. Grab you some of these accessories, a swim jig, the underspin, or just a belly-weighted EWG hook, and this particular bait by Big Bite Baits, and get out and catch some monster bass.

Jeremy:
My name is Jeremy, with Fishing the LoneStar. Make sure you subscribe below to the MONSTERBASS channel. Get out there, go catch some big fish.

Jeremy:
It's a good three and a half, four pound, right there. It's an awesome fish.

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