You NEED TO DO THIS! Swapping Treble Hooks On Lures (When, Why and HOW)

You NEED TO DO THIS! Swapping Treble Hooks On Lures (When, Why and HOW)


If you are using baits with treble hooks, you NEED to do this! Consider swapping out your stock treble hooks for upgraded ones. You may also consider using a red color to give your lures a REALLY different presentation. Swapping treble hooks is also SUPER easy to do and could save you some frustration by preventing you from losing fish. Check out these tips from Paul with @Burly Fishing and subscribe for more!

 

If you’re interested in taking your tackle selection to the next level, our team hand selects perfect tackle & gear based on where you love to fish the most.
Join today and save $10 off your first box. 
Use code SAVE10 at checkout.  JOIN NOW

#springbassfishing #bassfishingtips #MONSTERBASS #burlyfishing

Video transcript:

Paul:
What's going on everyone, Paul Burly Fishing here. Welcome back to the Monster Bass channel. Before we get into what is undoubtedly the most exciting, clickbaity title that you've ever heard about treble hooks. Thank you for stopping by the channel, if you're enjoying the videos, if you're enjoying the content, please like, please subscribe, hit the notification bell so you can see when we post more content. And if you're really enjoying it, please come check out the Burly Fishing channel. We've got unboxings, gear reviews. We have a live podcast, we got it all. So please come check us out as well. That being said, let's get down to, again, got to be the most exciting topic you've ever heard, treble hooks. Specifically, I want to talk a little bit about the ones that you're going to see in the April Monster Best Bag.

Paul:
You're going to see three treble hooks. They are red from Mustad. They're the KVD designed TG76. Now, these are a short shank treble hook and they're red. First of all, let's talk about a couple of the reasons why you might swap out treble hooks. I mean, cause it doesn't really make sense, you're not going to put a worm on this, right? So why do you need treble hooks? Your baits, like this XD that came also in the April bag, the common treble hooks. It's got treble hooks on it, why would I put other treble hooks on there? That doesn't make any sense. Actually, there's a couple of reasons why you might do that. First and foremost, one of the best reasons I think is if you get some inferior treble hooks, if they look like they're really light wire. If you've got big bass nearby and you don't want to lose a giant, maybe you caught a fish on an inferior treble and it bent out and you lost that fish. That has happened to me.

Paul:
I know I've seen videos where that has happened to Jeff. The one he caught his PB on actually bent out and almost lost that fish. If you're hooking giants, you want stout treble hooks. Another reason might be you have some old treble hooks on some lures that you use all the time, right? They get wet, you throw them in your box, you don't touch them for six months or a month or whatever and they start to rust up. You're going to want to swap out those trebles. Maybe they're just, you sharpen them so many times or you haven't sharpen them, you've got some that are dull. You're going to want to swap those out.

Paul:
So we're hooking you up with treble hooks to do exactly that. A couple of other reasons why you might think about swapping them out. Have you ever noticed a lot of times when you're casting, sometimes you get treble hooks that are actually too big for the bait on the hook. So for example, if you're casting out and you're finding that your line is constantly getting caught. Like, if your line's tight in here and you're treble hook is getting caught on the front on your line, that's not good. That means that likely your front treble hook is too big. Another reason might be your treble hooks are smaller than they need to be. So if you find that you're not getting the hookups that you want, swapping off the treble hook is actually is a great way to increase your hookups. One thing that I find is, a lot of these baits, they actually come with probably what is one size down, size than what you need. These look to be about size sixes, so I think I can probably put some fours on here and that's what actually came in here. So I'm going to walk you through an example of how to do that right now.

Paul:
Alright, so here's how we're going to swap out the treble hook on this bad boy. So I think this is the three XD from Strike King, dives 10 to 12 feet. It's going to come again in this bad boy bag right there in the month of April. Great bait, great for dredging out that deeper water or working it slow with a lot of action. Even in the six to eight foot range. But as you'll see, you've got some really small trebles, right? I mean the treble is kind of small, but look at that split ring, that thing is tiny. I'm just going to tell you right now, this digit right here is not going to do anything against that, I'm not getting in there.

Paul:
So how are we going to do that? How are we going to get this sucker off? Well, that's where your tools come in handy. So this is not just a pair of scissors for cutting braided line. This is also a pair of pliers and you can see, split ring pliers specifically have that little tooth right there. And that little tooth is great for getting into this little space. So I've just got it started. So I've got this one, this treble, so it's just like a key ring, starting to work its way out of that little ring. And I use my little hook to open this up and then start to work it off. Now the trick here is, don't just do one at a time. Now that I got it right here and set down very gently and I'm going to grab my next treble hook. The one I want to replace it with.

Paul:
Now, I'm actually going to use that same opening and I'm just going to follow the one I've already started. So yes, now I've got nine hooks going, slide my next one in there. So now I've got them both rolling. Now that I got them both going, now I don't have to open this up two times. That's really the trick, is now I don't have to open this up two times. So I'm going to start working the one out and I'm going to follow the other one with it. And you can use your pliers to start moving them together, to start spinning it. A little bit of safety so you're, get a little less finger in the game here, which is ideal. And eventually one of these is going to pop off and the other one's going to stay on. So just keep working it around, working it around. This is definitely a little bit of delicate work. This is one of the smaller rings I've ever actually done this on. It took me two or three tries to actually get one going.

Paul:
But this is good. I mean, I'd rather use the most difficult example than an easier one. Just to show you that it works. Oh, there goes the one so that's good, that's what we want to see. And the other one, bam, is on. Now, as you can see, this hook is a lot bigger than this hook, but it's still going to be tough for me to get hooked up. And that's because this is that short shank hook. Now the shank, that's this section right here. It's got a very similar gap, it's wider for sure. It's got a similar gap to this one, but it is a short shank. So you're getting big a decently wide gap, but that short shank allows you to actually go up a hook size without getting snagged on your rear treble. See, I'm not going to get snagged very often at all, especially with that smaller rear treble, but I've upsized my main treble. Now you can up-size both of these and I think you'd be just fine. There is a reason though and I'll talk about in a second, why I will only do, especially the red hook, why I will only do one of these. So let's move the camera and I'll talk to you about that.

Paul:
All right, so in what situation would I only swap out this hook? Why would I do that? So studies have been shown, that sometimes bass key in on bait that is already injured before they key in on bass that are healthy. So a bleeding fish obviously is one that a bass may key in on before a normal fish. So a lot of times you'll see bates that have a red spot, right at the neck or somewhere on the bait. What that's doing is that's imitating a wounded bait fish. And that little red spot is probably where that fish, right, that bass is actually going to go and smack the one that's injured. So what you're doing by showing that bass a red hook, is you're giving that little hint of red. Red is a color they very readily pick up on. You're giving them basically a bullseye on the exact place, the hook, where you want that bass to strike.

Paul:
So by replacing the one at the neck, you're painting your target at the best place where you want that bass to strike that lure. Not only on the hook, but also in the front portion of that base so that they swallow the whole bait and aren't just picking at the tail. So a red hook at the throat area, upsized, paired with, really honestly, in this case this should be up-sized as well. An up-sized rear treble hook is a great way to upgrade an already existing lure. And that is why you're getting red hooks. It's great to have replacement hooks, you can use these as replacement hooks, but it's an awesome way to just give you a little bit of an advantage. Especially right now in the spring time, when the bite honestly can be quite difficult, you're looking for that one edge that can help you out and catch you one more fish or get you a bite on a day when you haven't gotten bit.

Paul:
I know I've had in the last couple of like, two trips, I've gotten absolutely skunked, which is not fun, but if you're really grinding out days when the water is really cold and the bass aren't just hammering everything in sight, this could be that one thing that helps you catch a bass when nothing else will. So again, why are we giving you treble hooks, right? Is it the coolest thing to get in the bag? It doesn't seem that way at first. However, this is something that will serve you well throughout your entire season. Whether you're replacing hooks that are damaged, that are inferior, that have been bent already, or are otherwise broken in disrepair. This gives you a way to quickly get back in action and make sure that if you hook into your PB, you're going to keep that PB pinned to your bait.

Paul:
The other thing that's going to allow you to do, these red ones specifically that you're going to get from Mustad, the KVD's. Look, if KVD designed it, you know it's good, but these KVD Mustad's, this gives you a way to upgrade a current bait. Maybe it's one that you really like and you want to just make it that much better. This could be the thing that takes your bait and actually gets you a strike on a really, really tough day. So that's what I've got on treble hooks. I hope that you learned something useful. I hope you learned something that will catch you fish, bigger fish, more fish, whatever it happens to be. And at a minimum, I hope you learned something that helps you keep your tackle in the water longer. Thanks again for stopping by the channel. If you enjoy the video, smash the like button, ring the notification bell so you can see when we post the next video and with that, we'll catch you later on the channel and good luck catching some giants.

Older Post Newer Post


Leave a comment


0 comments

MONSTERBASS December Unboxing

December Unboxing | MONSTERBASS

Posted by 🔥 MONSTERBASS 🔥

7:46

Watch more videos